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>> everything's gone. i mean, everything we owned is completely gofnlt i mean, there's nothing left. and that's irrelevant, though, because people died. tales of survival after thursday's gas line explosion in san bruno. the investigation into what caused the disaster and what lawmakers will be doing to help today. nine years later, the anniversary of the september 11th attacks. what president obama is doing this morning to remember the victims and what's become of a pastor's plan to burn a stack of quran? it's 7:00 a.m. this saturday morning, the 11th of september. good morning. i'm julie watts. the national transportation safety board is now leading the investigation into that pipeline explosion that wiped
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out a san bruno neighborhood. and this morning, we're learning more about the lives lost in the fire. here's what we now know. four people are confirmed dead. 52 people were injured in the disaster. 37 homes have been completely destroyed. ann macks is vic is in san bruno this morning, where senator barbara boxer will be among those getting a briefing at the incident command this morning. good morning, ann. >> reporter: good morning. we are expecting more political appearances, more investigation, and a big town hall meeting this afternoon. here's the rundown of today's events. 59:15 this morning, lieutenant governor and senator barbara boxer will make an appearance here at the incident command center. at 1:00 this afternoon, mailed nad dough will visit san francisco general hospital to deliver condolences to burn victim families. then at 2:00 p.m. a town hall meeting at st. roberts catholic church at 1380
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crystal springs road. organizers say that is going to be the first step in the healing process for the devastated neighborhood. ruins were still smoldering this morning, as crews searched block after block for more destroyed homes and for more victims yesterday. more investigation into what the cause, analyzing the 30- inch pipeline's condition, maintenance history, pressure levels and the safeguards put in place to prevent pressure from building up. they will also be looking at training and experience of the people who operated the pipeline and screen them for alcohol and drugs. but what a lot of people are questioning this morning, reports made by several people here that they smelled gas in the days before the explosion and reported it to pg&e. >> they said the leak could be down the street and it could be venting out through the ground up over here, so they are not 100% sure on where the leak is yet. >> they repaired a leak valve
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to the washing machine. then we kept smelling the gases still. >> reporter: the ntsb is asking anyone who believes they smelled gas over the past few days or weeks here in this neighborhood to get a hold of local authorities immediately so they can interview them. now, cbs 5 also did uncover some questionable reports on the maintenance of pg&e pipes and the leak detection procedures. we'll talk a little bit more about that coming up in the next half hour. julie? >> we'll look forward to that, thank you, ann, from san brew know. the devastating blast in san bruno put firefighters to the test. 20 departments came out to fight. many say they faced the fiercest flames they have ever seen. >> i've been in service for 31 years, never seen anything like it. we used everything we had. at one point, we just tried to contain the flames, tried to just keep it in a plume, and that was our objective, and
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obviously it was so powerful, it blew right through our stream. >> the explosion severed a water line, delaying rescue efforts. firefighters were forced to improvise, running hoses from a nearby neighborhood, knocking down fences along the way. dozens of homes were destroyed in the blast. and this morning, the wait is over for some of those families left wondering if their home is still standing. kit doe was there as neighbors learned the fate of their homes. >> reporter: here at the main red cross shelter in san bruno, they came looking for news, good or bad. >> the list that's being distributed to you identifies a total of approximately 38 properties that have been visually evaluated as a total loss. >> reporter: the city of san bruno gather add group of homeowners to handout all at once, a list of addresses of damaged or destroyed properties. >> your house has no evidence of damage. >> okay, cool, thank you.
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>> reporter: for some, it was the first official confirmation that they still had a home to go back to. >> until we see with our own eyes. >> you got the good news? >> yeah, very good news. >> reporter: the force of the blast through this man, suffering second degree burns to his head, hand and back. >> you survived, your home survived. who do you thank? >> god. god. god helped me. >> reporter: the red cross wants all survivors to check in at the shelter at city parkway. that's where desiree barr found her mother. they had split up just as the flames moved in and destroyed their home. >> did you grow up in the house? >> yes, 10 years old, and my dad died in that house. all our memories are there. i saw that our house, it was all flat and i thought she had
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perished in the fire. >> thank god we're alive. >> reporter: kit doe, cbs 5. other nations have been pouring in from all over the city. blood centers were packed with people yesterday, eager to roll up their sleeves. shortly after the explosion, an urgent call was put out for o negative blood and the response was tremendous. th n san bruno held a number of bay area churches are offering support to victims of the blast. church of the highlands in san bruno held a special prayer service last night for fire victims. the church acts as a backup relief center for the red cross. leaders there say they received such an outpouring of support from the community that they are no longer accepting donations of supplies. and it's a similar situation at the red cross shelter for evacuees, where they are overwhelmed with donations. the red cross tells us they simply don't have the manpower to handle all of the food and the clothing. but as i witnessed yesterday,
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dozens of kind souls stepped in to help. >> we're very thankful. >> reporter: tina doesn't know what she would do without the hundreds who came out to donate to the victims of the san bruno gas line explosion. >> windows were busted out and fire engulfed our home and they had a rock through the back window. >> reporter: there's nothing left of her home on ground view. ground zero, the mass of explosion. she and her family must start over from scratch, and they are doing it with the help of people like colleen williams. >> for me, it was the very least that i can do, you know, and i just can't imagine. >> reporter: colleen spent all night and much of the morning sorting clothes and donations at this red cross shelter. eventually she was joined by dozens of others compelled to do something, anything, to help bring relief to those in need. >> just try to do what we can for the community. >> reporter: from clothes to toiletries, food, and bedding, there's been a steady stream of
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donations coming in from all over the bay area. >> i have diapers. i'll come back. >> reporter: many who came to donate volunteered to stay and sort, critical for this operation. >> actually red cross is not really set up to do -- to take what we call in-kind donations. >> reporter: without volunteers like colleen, they would have no way to get supplies to families in need like tina's. >> i want to say thank you for all your help and your support. >> at last check, the red cross was planning on keeping the shelter open for a couple more days. most of the evacuees are staying with family, friends, or in free donated hotel rooms. anything left over after the shelter is closed will be donated to local charities. the red cross says they can always use those financial donations. for details on how to help, go to our website, cbs5.com. you'll also find raw video and pictures from thursday's explosion. time now for a check of our forecast. so, what's it going to be like this weekend?
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>> well, you were wanting indian summer. this is it. >> how long will it last? >> about two days. >> not long. >> take advantage, because it will be brief. a great weekend taking shape out here, warm temperatures, sunny skies and chance of rain, coming soon. >> chance of rain and indian summer! double whammy! we'll talk more about weather coming up. also coming up, remember the attacks on the world trade center nine years later. what u.s. leaders are doing today to mark the anniversary and why a pastor who planned to burn a stack of qurans changed his mind. plus, she won't be coming home today. why the iranian leaders suddenly reversed their decision to release one of the u.s. hikers held in captivity for more than a year. ,,
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as governor, he cut waste got rid of the mansion and the limo budgets were balanced. $4 billion in tax cuts. world class schools and universities. clean energy promoted. 1.9 million new jobs created. california was working. i'm jerry brown. california needs major changes. we have to live within our means; we have to return power and decision making to the local level-closer to the people and no new taxes without voter approval. jerry brown the knowledge and know-how to get california working again.
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iran has postponed the release of one of those three cal grads accused of spying. thursday, the iranian government announced plans to release sarah shourd today, but the judicial authorities intervened, saying she must first stand trial. no new release date has been set. showered, her fiance, josh, and shane bauer were arrested last july after they crossed the border into iran. the former students say they accidentally crossed the border while hiking. somber memorials are taking place around the country this morning to mark the ninth anniversary of the september 11
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terrorist attacks. this is a live look at the memorial services taking place in new york city. among the speakers at ground zero this morning are vice president joe biden and former new york mayor rudolph giuliani. and the controversial florida pastor is also in new york this morning. he's the one who planned to mark the 9/11 anniversary by burning qurans. the book burning is now on hold and he hopes to broker a deal with the imam of the proposed mosque near ground zero. but the pastor is struggling to get a response. >> reporter: pastor terry jones arrived in new york city on the eve of the september 11 commemoration. it was not clear whether anyone involved in the islamic center project near ground zero was willing to meet with him. the trip capped off two days in which jones went from planning to burn copies of the quran to canceling the event, to at least postponing it for now.
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>> there will be no quran burning tomorrow, 6:00, as planned. >> reporter: the florida preacher originally announced that he would stop the quran burning because he believed the imam in new york had agreed to move the location of the islamic cultural center and to meet with him. but imam raff issued a statement saying he has no plans to meet with jones, won't barter, and apparently won't even take his calls. >> we would like to make an announcement, and like i said, give a challenge to the imam in new york. >> reporter: joan asked imam fiesel to call him back. >> we have not heard from the imam, but are still hopeful. >> reporter: at a news conference this morning, president obama said burning the quran goes against freedom of religion and interests. >> this kind of behavior or threats of action put our young men and women in harm's way. >> reporter: in gainesville, several religious groups called on jones not to burn copies of
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the muslim holy book, including one group saying it has the signatures of thousands of people from 90 countries who are against the plan. as for reverend jones, his next move is anyone's guess. michael hearstenberg for cbs news, gainesville, florida. well, closer to home, changing gears here, weather wise, it's beautiful. it was beautiful and sunny, really wasn't much fog even yesterday, at least for much of the day in the city and of course it's been beautiful all over the bay area. two more days of this? >> there you go. that's your forecast. >> back to you! that's me! show us some pretty pictures. >> i'll show you pictures. you pretty much hit it on the head. gorgeous day for today, much like yesterday. no fog to speak of this morning. it will return beginning of the work week. taking a look outside right now, we can see we were joshing. >> just kidding, it's there! >> at the golden gate, looking elsewhere across the bay, pretty clear, but obviously it
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is close, as the golden gate seems to be the demarkation line for the fog, as it often is this morning. it will give way to mostly sunny skies there. taking a look elsewhere around the bay, we'll find a bit more sunshine to check in on, as through the afternoon hours we're we can expect temperatures to warm out across the interior. there's some of that sunshine, i promised you there. i wasn't seeing things when i looked out the window, which i try to do every morning. as we check the valley, mostly sunny. high pressure in the air, lot of haze and smog in the weekend. low temperatures in the low 90s for the hot spots. mid-80s at the bay, 70s back at the beach, as again, this high pressure system will prevail with mostly sunny skies and warm temperatures. obviously a little bit of fog still lingering right at the
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gate and on the coast. but it is very patchy and minimal this morning. now, through the week we'll see this frontal system drop out of the gulf of alaska and approach the california shoreline here by the end of the week, into the next weekend. could bring with it a chance of rain. not so much for us, mainly across the oregon border. but the significant thing here is once again, it is early in the season and we're already looking at the potential for rain approaching the coast. warm and sunny today, bit of an offshore flow to keep skies mostly clear here throughout the region. we'll look for that to continue here. and over in alameda, we've got men in skirts. no, it's not the sisters of indulgence. it's the scotts, as there's a gathering and games taking place at the alameda fairgrounds today. they will be throwing logs around there. as we see temperatures bumping up nicely today, once again into the mid to upper 80s in and around the bay, upper 80s to low 90s out across the
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interior, even toasty back at the beach. alzheimers memory walk in mission bay today, mostly sunny skies there. temperatures in the low 60s first thing this morning. and of course we've got football games this weekend. they will be looking at a chance of rain up in seattle for the 49ers here this weekend. shouldn't be a washout, but maybe a bit damp. as we take a look at the seven- day forecast, temperatures peak out today and tomorrow, cooling them slightly as we head into the week, with that chance of showers and cooler skies settling in just in time for next weekend. so do take advantage of this balmy weather. as i mentioned, it will be cooling off and it may be a while. >> not ready for rain yet. i'm going to go on record as saying that. >> well, ready or not, here it comes! >> thanks, jim. more in a bit. meantime, much more ahead on the explosion in san bruno, including the three things everyone needs to know about fire insurance. and people aren't the only ones impacted by the explosion. the services being offered to
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help displaced pets. >> notice that there were no books in the children's homes. disappointing discovery for a teacher visiting young students. how this week's jefferson award winner helps youngsters build their home libraries for pocket change. san bruno. ,, when it comes to veterans, no one fights harder than jerry mcnerney. when some vets were forced to travel hours for care, mcnerney fought for a new v.a. medical facility, and won. mcnerney took on washington gridlock, to improve care for vets with traumatic brain injuries. his plan became law. that's why vfw state commander dave norris endorsed mcnerney. i'm jerry mcnerney, and i'm honored to approve this message. thanks, dad.
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people aren't the only ones who need help after the explosion in san bruno. the peninsula humane society is caring for all the rescued pets from the disaster zone. the agency picked up more than a dozen animals from homes. none of them were hurt, but anybody who lost an animal in the disaster should contact the spca. the agency says it is still accepting pet food donations to care for these animals. we put all the details, as well as more information on our website. check it out at cbs5.com. well, here's a woman who knows all about giving a helping hand. she's a veteran teacher who created a book store that has helped change the lives of thousands of students. kate kelly introduces us this week to this week's jefferson award winner. >> reporter: for 21 years, nancy caldwell has worked among these classrooms and hallways at franklin elementary school
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in san jose. and though she retired from teaching this year, she's left an impressive legacy. >> did you find a book you wanted? >> reporter: nancy started the student-run book store at her school. for 15 years, every week at lunchtime, students can browse and buy lightly used children's books for just a few quarters. teaching in a low socioeconomic area, where parents are paying rent and money for food and that's about all they can afford. >> reporter: when nancy was invited into her student's homes, she saw a need she could fill. >> i noticed that there were no books in the children's homes and books are important to learning. >> reporter: nancy first started this book store at school after reading an article in parade magazine, where a teacher in new york had created a similar program. >> i thought, oh, i could do that, too. >> reporter: her second graders named it the coolest book store and they take care of marketing, the money, and some even try a little diplomacy in monitoring the classroom door.
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and they have become discerning shoppers. >> the cover and the inside, i could read it a little and i'm, like, oh, this is good! >> our children are now reading every night. they log in what they are reading at home. they get credit for doing that. >> reporter: teachers marilyn miller and losha bore emhave volunteered to take over the project now that nancy has retired. >> clearly they love it. this is a big tradition she is passing on to us. >> reporter: nancy estimates thousands of books have found new homes with her students and retirement won't keep her from scouring local flea markets and garage sales in search of more. >> it's made a difference, encourages me more to continue. >> reporter: so for inspiring thousands of young lives to a lifetime of learning, this week's jefferson award in the bay area goes to nancy caldwell. kate kelly, cbs 5. >> the coolest book store always needs more lightly used
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books to stock the shelves. you can use the link on our website, cbs5.com/jefferson awards for more information. to call it swiewd be an understatement. what we've learned from the san bruno explosion and what you need to know about fire insurance before disaster strikes. and i'm live in san bruno, where the recovery effort continues today. we will tell you what is expected and a town hall meeting this afternoon, coming up. ,,,,
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>> everything's gone. i mean, everything we owned is completely gone. i mean, there's nothing left. and that's irrelevant, though, because people died. tales of survival after thursday's gas line explosion in san bruno. the investigation into what caused the disaster and what lawmakers will be doing today to help. what's next for homeowners who lost everything in the explosion? well, what everyone should know about the fire insurance before disaster strikes. welcome back to the weekend early edition. it's just about 7:30. good morning. i'm julie watts. the national transportation safety board is now leading the investigation into that pipeline explosion that wiped out a san bruno neighborhood. and this morning, we're learning more about the lives lost in the fire. here's what we now know. four people are confirmed dead. 52 people were injured in the disaster. 37 homes have been completely
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destroyed. ann mackovic is at the incident command center this morning. >> reporter: today we are expecting more political appearances, more investigation, and a town hall meeting. here is the rundown of some of today's events here in san bruno. at 9:15 this morning, lieutenant governor maldonado and senator barbara boxer are expected to meet with local authorities to get an update on what's going on. at 1:00 this morning, maldonado will visit san francisco general hospital to deliver condolences to burn victims' families. and at 2:00 this afternoon, a big town hall meeting here in san bruno at st. roberts catholic church. that address is 1380 crystal springs road. organizers say that will be the first step in the healing process for this devastated neighborhood. ruins were still smoldering there this morning and crews were searching block after block of destroyed homes for
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more potential victims late yesterday. now, today, the investigation will continue into what caused the explosion in the 30-inch pipeline. the national transportation safety board is analyzing the line's condition, maintenance history, and pressure levels. they will also be looking at training and experience of the people who operated the pipeline and screen them for alcohol and drugs. but what a lot of people here are questioning this morning, reports made by several people here that they smelled gas in the days before the explosion and reported it to pg&e. >> we want to know the answers to those allegations as well. and we will be cooperating fully with the ntsb, as they investigate that aspect of the accident. and so we want to know what happened and they will get to the root cause of it. >> have you started any process of that? >> we have started prior to the ntsb arriving, and now that they are here, they have assumed responsibility for the investigation from this point forward. >> reporter: since we weren't getting far with pg&e on that,
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cbs 5 did some of our own investigation and found the ntsb released a report in may showing the california public utilities commission investigated pg&e and uncovered that field representatives were not properly trained in detecting leaks. this morning the ntsb is asking anyone who might have smelled gas in that area in the days or weeks before this explosion to come forward to local authorities to be interviewed immediately. that's all going to be part of this investigation. julie? >> ann, thank you. crews will be out with cadaver dogs searching for remains today. search teams were out yesterday, but no more victims turned up. about a quarter of the houses were just too hot to look through. we spoke with one man who barely made it out alive, suffering second and third degree burns. here's his story. >> then all of a sudden i was just walking and my floor
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completely came, wood floors just exploded up, threw me against the wall. after it threw me, i got up. i went to the back door and i looked out the back dorr and i saw my hot tub and everything on fire. backyard, flames were shooting across my backyard. i opened the door and the black smoke came in. i went, oh, man, i'm in trouble here. as i opened the front door, it just exploded in my face and i fell back and then like asphalt from the ground was shooting into the house. so i slammed the door shut. i couldn't even move. i couldn't even -- i was just on fire immediately. so i turned the other way and i started to run up the hill. next thing i know, my feet, my shoes are melting, so i threw my shoes off and i'm running up the street. the ground is so hot and i'm just feeling myself just peeling. then i saw my neighbor across the street holding his two little babies in his hand and the back of his legs were just
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completely burned up. people were just -- i mean, just screaming, man. >> if i would have waited another 2 or 3 minutes, that was t i wouldn't have got out the door, because the flames were surrounding the house all the way around. it was -- it was a massive, massive flame! and it wouldn't stop. >> everything's gone. i mean, everything we own is completely gone. i mean, there's nothing left. that's irrelevant, though, because people died. other people died, you know? >> doctors wanted greg to stay in the hospital, but he chose to leave to be with his wife and daughter, who were not home at the time of the explosion. it's now been 42 hours since that massive explosion. san bruno's fire chief is finally getting a chance to reflect on how crews handled the disaster. first responders were definitely put to the test, and as don knapp shows us, some things were simply out of their control. >> reporter: within minutes of the first call at 6:12:00 p.m., firefighters were on the scene,
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facing the fiercest flames they had ever seen. >> i've been in service for 31 years, never seen anything like it. >> reporter: 18 minutes later, the fire had gone to six alarms. crews from at least 20 other fire departments, including san francisco international airport, half moon bay and alameda came to fight. they were at a disadvantage. >> we used everything we had. we had foam, water. at some point we said we just tried to contain flames, try to just keep it in a plume. and that was our objective and obviously it was so powerful, it blew right through our streams. >> reporter: it took pg&e crews as long as an hour and a half to turn off the 70 to 100-foot flames from the high pressure gas line buried just 3 feet undergroind. >> we tried to knock the fire down. obviously when you get that much heat, sometimes you're not going to be successful. at that point, we call it defensive mode and kind of pull back, reassess, make sure no one's going to get hurt and then we just try to protect anything we can protect. >> reporter: the chief credits pg&e crews with working fast to
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shut down a major delivery and smaller distribution lines. but the blast also whipped out a water line, cutting the fire department's supply. >> it created a delay, but all in all, we didn't have much success with the water putting out the fire at that point. so we adjusted our units to keep explosions down and waited for the flame to be put out. >> reporter: despite the obstacles and delays, neighbors generally praised the response. >> police and fire? it was almost instantaneous. i thought they were superb. >> reporter: this man says firefighters came together and did what he called a marvelous job. >> no one in the world is prepared to fight this, unless you're ready for a carpet bomb with nay palm, because in the photos right here, this looks like apock lips now. no one can prepare for this. no one. >> reporter: another part of the response story is california's mutual aid dispatch. they treat the entire county like one big fire department.
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as each alarm comes in, they dispatch the next closest equipment and people. in the end, 170 piece of equipment, 50 or 60 firefighters put out this fire. in san bruno, don knapp, cbs 5. >> an incredible effort by rescue workers. a number of bay area churches are offering support to victims of the blast. n]♪ >> this church acts as a backup relief center for the red cross. leaders there say they have received such an outpouring of support from the community, they are no longer accepting donations of supplies. insurance companies are now starting to process claims from the disaster. and some are already giving out payment to help tide people over. as dana king reports, there's also another bit of comforting news for homeowners. >> reporter: people who saw their homes go up in flames last night have a lot to worry
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about. but insurance experts amy box says they shouldn't worry about who is going to pay the bill. >> this kind of damage, fire, is really the, the core of a homeowners insurance policy. it's the one thing you can almost always be sure is covered. >> reporter: box says if pg&e is found to be responsible, the utility will also have to help homeowners. >> for most people, there will be two sources of money for the repairs and the rebuilding. >> reporter: homeowner deductibles in fire cases are generally small. usually about 500 or $1000. the first step now for home oh, is to contact their insurance company. five insurers have already set up mobile offices at san bruno city park. betty and bill were there starting the claim process. they got an immediate payment of $5000 from travelers insurance. most homeowner policies do cover living expenses, like
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motel, food, and transportation. if your home is uninhabitable, the insurance company should offer it to you immediately after a disaster, but if not, policy holders should ask for funds. >> that was dana king reporting. we've put resources and contacts for homeowners who have insurance questions on our website, cbs5.com. now, switching gears a bit and talking about the forecast, another beautiful weekend in store? >> another gorgeous weekend out there. already clear skies, warmer temperatures headed our way for the next few days. just some patchy fog with a chance of rain creeping over the horizon through the week. we'll talk about that and more, coming up in your complete forecast. we'll be right back. ,,,,
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you inhale, they inhale. millions of children continue to be exposed to secondhand smoke. secondhand smoke causes asthma, a disease that cannot be cured. protect your loved ones. explos well, there's been an outpouring of support to help the victims of the san bruno explosion. alan mayormont silver is a volunteer from the red cross, joining us this morning to tell folks at home how you can help. really the best way to help. so i spent the day at one of the evacuation centers yesterday and numerous people, just wonderful people are bringing in plenty of goods,
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food, water, clothing. but ellen, you're saying the red cross really can't handle all those goods, right? >> that's correct. the red cross really tries to give people immediate needs, meet their immediate needs. and that we do throughputting them up in hotels, purchasing food, clothing, things like that. but we can't take random quantities of these items. so unless you are a major corporation with huge pallets of water to give us, we can't accept water donations. really we're looking for financial donations because then we can put them to the best use. i know the red cross would prefer a generic financial donation. but a lot of folks locally are saying if i donate, i want it to go directly to the san bruno victims. you call them clients, right? >> they are clients, but victimized by this experience. it's a terrible experience, and our hearts go out to them, of course. >> absolutely. so now, if i wanted to give money and make sure it goes to these folks, can i ear mark my
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donation, saying in care of the san bruno fire? >> you could always do that. the best way to do it is say, to say disaster relief fund, because at a certain point, we will use up the money that would have been going right to san bruno and all the areas around there that were effected. and so then if we have leftover money, but it says san bruno, then we can't do anything with it because we don't want to spend more than necessary on any given disaster. so if you make a check out or if you call or go online and say disaster relief fund, we know it will get to the best place. sometimes people say, well, i really want it to go here, to the corner of 4th and maine. if you want to do that, go to the corner of 4th and maine and give it to somebody, because we can't be that specific, but we will, believe me, we will be taking care of the people in san bruno. for the donations, and there have been a lot of them that you received so far. >> yes. it's my understanding those will now go to other charities if they aren't used by the actual victims of the explosion. >> we have partnerships with
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other organizations. i can't tell you directly that any money that we're getting would go to them. that's not the usual way. in huge, huge, like katrina level disasters, sometimes we would end up having to pay for some services that some other agency might provide. but it's not typical that we give money away that people give to us, because when donors give money to the red cross, they want to know that the red cross is in charge of it and taking care of it. right. now, i mean specifically the food and the clothing and all of the in-kind donations that have been stacking up at the shelter from all those very generous people out there. >> i saw a ton testify yesterday as well and it was wonderful. they were feeding everybody, firefighters, volunteers, as well as clients. it was very heart warming. i'm really eager to go back this morning. and anything left over, don't worry. if you dough nateed food or clothing, that will go to another charity. it will be used for a good cause. >> oh, definitely. >> thank you so much for joining us this morning. we really appreciate it. thanks for all that you're doing for the folks in san
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bruno. >> thank you. >> ellen mayormont, a pleasure. time for a check of our forecast with jim. >> mostly clear skies, a pit of patchy fog here and there around the bay, but not around the tower. as i get out of the way, you'll see lots of blue out there. again, just some patchy fog clinging to the golden gate and various spots on the coast, giving way to mostly sunny. a bit of haze in the air today. high pressure system will be dominant through the weekend. that means air quality will take a hit here and be moderate for most locations, as we see that sinking air mass create kind of a stagnant pattern. temperature wise, we'll peak out today and tomorrow with temperatures in the hot spots in the low 90s. back at the bay today, we'll look for upper 70s to mid-80s, even 70s at the beach, as again, we will see temperatures warming through the weekend. high pressure in control across the west. we do have a storm track headed our way, which will gradually
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inch in our direction through the week. could be bringing with it a chance of showers by the weekend, but i believe most of that energy as far as moisture, will remain to our north up in the puget sound and that area. as we look for warm and sunny conditions throughout the bay, bit of an offshore flow today, keeping skies clear and we will look for that trend to continue into and through tomorrow. for opera in the park, we are looking for 62 degrees today, lots of sunshine out there and lots of people as well. as we take at our temperature forecast here, we see temperatures a little warmer than yesterday. again, upper 80s, low 90s across the interior. even around the bay, we look for mid to upper 80s here with 70s popping up in the city and back to the beach. also, best buddies challenge taking place in caramel to san simeon here. mostly sunny skies with seasonal temperatures and patchy low clouds. another local football game taking place in tennessee.
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raiders will be taking on the titans. partly cloudy, 79 degrees there. as we take a look at the seven- day forecast, we see this warming trend to peak out here this weekend, gradually cooling through the week and by next weekend, we're going to hang on to the cool temperatures and there will probably be a chance of showers to our north. now, that's not unusual this time of year to hear about a chance of showers, but this is not the first one we've talked about so far this year. looks like an early fall is on the way, definitely settling in, in and around the bay here at this point. but make a point to enjoy this warmup here this weekend, because it will probably be brief. >> two-day summer, thanks a lot! >> better than nothing! >> i know, i know! optimism. >> you saw that coming. [ laughter ] >> i know you too well! well, coming up in sports, the giants had a chance to pull even with the padres to the top of the national league west. and some hustle late in the game helped san francisco's cause. kim coyle will have the highlights, coming up. s to
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plus, an event for all of you foodies out there. how to put seasonal peppers and tomatoes to good use. we have tips from a bay area farmer, live onset. that's coming up, too. ,,,,,,,,,,
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♪ i thought it was over here... ♪ [car horn honks] our outback always gets us there...
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... sometimes it just takes us a little longer to get back. ♪ well, this morning, we've got a guy on the cutting edge of 21st century farming techniques. he's an urban farmer using a greenhouse in his own backyard to grow 30 different varieties of peppers and plants. david winford, good morning, thank you for being here. i'm very excited to learn about these peppers. you are here -- there's a big event going on at the farmers market today, right? >> yeah, today's pepper and tomato tasting festival. this is the top of the season for tomatoes and peppers. >> sounds a little dangerous to
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me. i'm going to the farmers market, tasting peppers, could be dangerous, right? >> we do have some dangerous varieties. this variety right here, for example, looks very innocent, called man santo in mexico. they also call it chile pearan, looks like a red bell, except it's smaller. it's called an atom type, gorgeous purple flowers, back seeds and it's fiery. >> how do we know when we're shopping, for instance, tasting peppers, how would i know that something's going to be spicy or not? >> you should ask the person that's selling them. there are a lot of peppers -- i have customers come and tell me, for example, this is a hot pepper. this is one of our very sweetest ones. this is a roasting type. they are extremely delicious to just throw on a barbecue. throw them on the barbecue and they just disappear. we never have leftovers. >> sometimes i'm at the grocery store looking at peppers and i would by sight assume this is a hot pepper and that one is a
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mild pepper. is there a way for me to detect at the grocery stores? is there labeling? >> well, that's also a problem. i think with columbus who got it mixed up from the start, he was trying to say he made it all the way to the far east, sew started calling these peppers. they are actually all chiles. all peppers are chiles. it's only one gene that determines whether it's hot or not. there are varieties that are completely sweet and brutally fiery. there are a hundred varieties, but only two represent most of what we eat. so like a pew besident means it's a type, serranos are like that, popular in peru, but not far out. for example, this is poblano. people don't realize that a poblano, when it ripens becomes an ancho. poblano, very confusing. the recipe calls for poblano. these are both really poblanos,
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just sweeter. >> interesting. good to know f folks want to head out and learn more about pepper tasting, tomato tasting, come see you at the farmers market today. >> you bet? >> what time is the ?eefnt. >> it's all day, at the market officially 10:00 to 2:00, but it's open right now. today is 9:00 to 2:00, right? 8:00 to 2:00. >> okay. well head on out to ferry plaza farmers market to the tomato and pepper festival. i believe i've learned more about peppers in the last 2 minutes than in my entire life. thank you for coming in today. still ahead, an outpouring of support for the people affected by the disaster in san bruno. what you can do to help. ,,,,,,,,
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as governor, he cut waste got rid of the mansion and the limo budgets were balanced. $4 billion in tax cuts. world class schools and universities. clean energy promoted. 1.9 million new jobs created. california was working. i'm jerry brown. california needs major changes.
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we have to live within our means; we have to return power and decision making to the local level-closer to the people and no new taxes without voter approval. jerry brown the knowledge and know-how to get california working again. in sports, the a's displayed some aerobic defense,
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as they -- acrobatic, one of the two, hosting the red sox in oakland. and the giants were in san diego with an opportunity for first place in their division. here's kim coyle with the highlights. g with more info good morning, everyone. after winning the series opener in san diego, the giants had a chance to pull even with the padres last night. scoreless game in the seventh,aribe chops to third, beating the throw to first. aubrey huff scores. giants win 1-0 and are now tied for first in the west. trevor cahill picks up his 16th win of the season. the a's all-star got a little help from cocoa crisp. he robs ryan kay liss of the homer. a's beat the sox 5-0. neither williams sister will win the u.s. open. serena missed the tournament with a foot injury and venus was knocked out in the semifinals by kim clijsters.
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finals later tonight. earlier yesterday, the 7th seed upset top seed wozniacki in straight sets. despite shooting a 62, kutcher remains in the lead at the bmw championship. tiger woods is 9 shots back. coming up at 9:00, it is the u.s. open men's semi final. that's a look at sports. have a great day. we want to leave you this morning with more information on how you can help the victims of the explosion in san bruno. yesterday, people waited in line for hours to donate blood. this was the scene in mill wright. officials say they haven't seen a turnout like this since the attacks on the world trade center nine years ago today. now, blood banks are requesting that you postpone those donations, because that freshly donated blood can only be stored for up to six weeks. they would like you to make regular donations. and those displaced by the
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fire also receiving donations in the form of clothes, toiletries, food, bedding. people have been dropping off supplies by the truckload at the red cross shelter in san bruno. and volunteers have been sorting them out. the red cross shelter will be open a few more days. it is preferred that you donate money instead, as they are already overwhelmed with these physical donations. if you would like to donate online, there's a link to the red cross, cbs5.com. also, the humane society, peninsula humane society is caring for all of the pets that were rescued from the disaster zone. they can use food and financial donations as well. >> lot of help coming in there. that's a good thing. >> absolutely. people have been amazing. weather wise today, sunny skies and warm temperatures. so make a point to enjoy it, because we'll be cooling. that does it for today. we'll see you back here tomorrow morning. have a great saturday morning. >> we'll see you first thing in the morning. >> dark and early! ,,
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the guys who drive a heavy duty truck, like enough horsepower and torque to get out of just about any situation. a payload that beats the other guys flat out. a frame sturdy enough to bear up a max towing capacity that's over 10 tons. and a braking system tough enough to bring it all to a stop. heavy duty demands? gentlemen, your truck is ready. having the right real estate agent on your side is more important than ever. at remax.com, you can find the experts you need, whether you're trying to sell of hoping to buy. nobody sells more real estate than re/max.

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CBS 5 Eyewitness News at 7am
CBS September 11, 2010 6:00am-7:00am PST

News News/Business. Chan and Matier. New. (CC)

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